!
!

Codec

!

A program used for encoding and decoding a digital signal, usually employing compression/decompression algorithms to streamline the data and conserve bandwidth. In software, a codec is a computer program that compresses/decompresses digital audio data according to a given audio file format or streaming audio format. The object of a codec algorithm is to represent the high-fidelity audio signal with minimum number of bits while retaining the quality. This can effectively reduce the storage space and the bandwidth required for transmission of the stored audio file.

Colorstream

!
Colorstream was a proprietary technology developed by Toshiba but is rarely used now.
With ColorStream HD Inputs, a video signal bypasses your TV's tuner, comb filter and NTSC decoder and is delivered to your TV in its base components (Y, Pr, Pb). The inputs accept 480i, 480p, or 1080i signals, making your TV HDTV-compatible. This allows you to connect both an HDTV STB source and a progressive scan DVD player.

Component

!
A legacy video connection for home theater equipment, using three separate cables to send a picture in three discrete color channels, e.g. red, green, and blue.

Composite

!
Composite video is the format of an analog television (picture only) signal before it is combined with a sound signal and modulated onto an RF carrier. Composite video is the most common type of video interface for sending or receiving an analog video signal to or from a television set. A composite video interface might connect a VHS tape player, DVD player or game console to a television.
Composite video is a yellow, female RCA jack, normally found next to two audio jacks, one red, the other white. The three jacks together provide an interface for audiovisual connections. The red RCA jack connects the right channel of a stereo system, while the white RCA jack connects the left. The yellow composite video jack rounds out the set.

Content Type

!

Content type is a feature introduce in the HDMI 1.4 specification where the source and sink (display) HDMI devices tag the type of content being transmitted and automatically adjust the display settings to give an optimum representation of the picture.

This is important as text, video and digital still camera pictures often use different color spaces and resolution settings. These can now be automatically optimized by source and sink devices that support the content type feature.

Deep Color

!
Deep Color is a term used to describe a gamut comprised of a billion or more colors. Displays may express the capability of showing Deep Color while image data may express the characteristic of having Deep Color information.
The color data stored for each pixel is an absolute representation of that pixel's color. This contrasts to a color table system where each pixel is flagged with color data that points to an entry in a color table.
The xvYCC, sRGB, and YCbCr color spaces can be used with Deep Color systems.

Dolby Digital

!
A family of multi-channel audio codecs from Dolby Laboratories, based on AC-3 technology, that includes Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital EX, Dolby Digital Live, Dolby Digital Surround EX, and Dolby Digital Plus.

Dolby TrueHD

!
An advanced audio codec developed by Dolby Laboratories. Dolby TrueHD is a lossless audio format, meaning that no audio information is lost when the signal is compressed and uncompressed. Dolby TrueHD is Dolby’s latest lossless technology, developed for high-definition disc-based media. The sound is bit-for-bit identical to the studio master, so listening at home is like being in the studio while the movie or video is being mixed, or at the sound board at a live concert. With Dolby TrueHD, the listener hears exactly what was captured during the recording and mastering process.

DTS

!
DTS (also known as Digital Theater System, owned by DTS, Inc., is a multi-channel digital surround sound format used for both commercial/theatrical and consumer grade applications. It is used for in-movie sound both on film and on DVD, on CD.

DTS-HD Master Audio

!
DTS-HD Master Audio, previously known as DTS++, is the second of two DTS-HD audio formats. It supports a virtually unlimited number of surround sound channels, can downmix to 5.1 and two-channel, and can deliver audio quality at bit rates extending from DTS Digital Surround up to lossless (24-bit, 192 kHz). DTS-HD Master Audio is selected as an optional surround sound format for Blu-ray and HD DVD, where it has been limited to a maximum of 8 discrete channels. DTS-HD MA supports variable bit rates up to 24.5 Mbit/s on a Blu-ray Disc and up to 18.0 Mbit/s for HD DVD, with 2 channel encoded at up to 192 kHz or 8 channels encoded at 96 kHz/24 bit.